Syria, Turkey

Balancing Syrian and Turkish Securities

Pictured above:  A collaboration between the Syrian and Turkish governments on a building-restoration project.  No friendly collaborations between the two governments exists today.

 

Recent security threats with accompanied violence in Turkey have turned Turks’ attention to the accountability of their government figures and the Syrian Civil War (fun fact: Turkey’s longest border is with Syria).  Both Syria and Turkey, a long time ago (i.e., about 8 years ago) in this galaxy, once agreed on a visa-free travel path between them.  Today’s relationship between the two countries presents a stark contrast alongside sets of travellers that want more to travel than just pleasure and business.  Such travellers are, for the most part, travelling for the sake of their lives.

 

During the visa-free travel age, Turkey and Syria bragged towards their citizens about the upcoming train systems between the two countries. If the train system were to be running today, it would take one from Damascus to Ankara in less than a day.
During the visa-free travel age, Turkey and Syria bragged towards their citizens about the upcoming train systems between the two countries. If the train system were to be running today, it would take one from Damascus to Ankara in less than a day.

Much of my Syrian family has benefitted from Turkish hospitality and, more importantly, from Turks’ willingness to save Syrian lives.  However, that willingness has spurred insecurities for Turkey that have, unfortunately, torn families apart.

Screenshot 2016-04-08 at 10.44.09 AM

Although the movement of Syrian refugees throughout Turkey is not the primary cause or factor behind Turkey’s recent horrors, the shifting political dynamics associated with those movements has damaged security apparatuses and has inspired the perpetrators of these attacks to accomplish these condemnable acts.

I look forward to the days when Syria and Turkey, between which I see myself as a fulcrum, not only merely collaborate on infrastructure projects, but also rejoice over their common goals for camaraderie, innovation, and education.

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